Day 261 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“After an exchange of niceties, I asked the Chancellor whether an incident on the Polish, Austrian or French border which drew an enemy into the Reich would be allowed to be a casus belli. Of course he said, ‘No, no.’ I then said in case such a thing were to occur in the Ruhr valley would you hold off and call a conference of the European powers? He said: ‘That would be my purpose, but we might not be able to restrain the German people.’ (I saw that he meant the violent Nazis whom he has trained to violence.) I continued: If you would wait and call a conference, Germany would regain her popularity outside. . . Many other subjects were touched upon. My final impression was of his belligerence and self-confidence.”

William E. Dodd, United States Ambassador to Germany, Ambassador Dodd’s Diaries, October 17, 1933

Day 257 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“We then talked of dangers to Germany and of the growing hostility abroad. [Von Neurath] repeated as usual how fully he agreed with me, but I’m afraid the lesson of economic nationalism has not been learned by him or, more important, by Hitler himself. If they really believe a country can be economically independent and discard international codes of behavior, as I suspect they do, real trouble will come.”

William E. Dodd, United States Ambassador to Germany, Ambassador Dodd’s Diaries, October 13, 1933

Day 249 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“Mr. Crane…was enthusiastic about his Hitler interview…Crane found Hitler simple, enthusiastic, bent on stirring the German people to passionate self-confidence and wanting in knowledge of foreign problems. This is the same story I have heard again and again.”

William E. Dodd, United States Ambassador to Germany, Ambassador Dodd’s Diaries, October 5, 1933

Day 192 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“I told him the Jewish problem must be solved in a different way; that German exports would continue to fall if the ruthlessness were not abandoned; and that the belligerent tone of German conduct would almost certainly lead to international boycott. I concluded: The Nazis do not seem to me to know what are the natural consequences of ruthless procedure.”

William E. Dodd, United States Ambassador to Germany, Ambassador Dodd’s Diaries, August 9, 1933

Day 258 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“…Hitler spoke over the radio to Germany, the rest of Europe and the United States, announcing the German withdrawal from the League [of Nations] and from the Disarmament Conference and proclaiming a Reich election for November 14. The speech was moderate for him. He demanded equal rights with other nations as to armaments, defended his ‘revolution’ as simply an anti-Communist move, and assured the world of peaceful intentions…It was not the address of a thinker, but of an emotionalist claiming that Germany had in no way been responsible for the World War and that she was the victim of wicked enemies…The Germans have made another huge blunder for want of statesmen.”

William E. Dodd, United States Ambassador to Germany, Ambassador Dodd’s Diaries, October 14, 1933

DAY 1224 of Charles Taylor’s Presidency (Liberia)

“Public services continue to deteriorate even as Mr. Taylor and his family – several of his relatives head ministries – loot Liberia, according to Western diplomats, international workers, Liberian and foreign business people here. A principal income source in the last couple of years has been Liberia’s rain forests, according to these officials. The Forestry Development Authority, headed by the president’s brother, Robert, has allowed a shadowy logging company, Oriental Timber, with headquarters in Hong Kong but mostly Indonesian workers in Liberia, to wipe out entire forests, diplomats say.”

Norimitsu Onishi, “In Ruined Liberia, Its Despoiler Sits Pretty,” The New York Times, February 7, 2000. http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/07/world/in-ruined-liberia-its-despoiler-sits-pretty.html

DAY 286 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“And a couple of hundred thousand rootless internationalists—‘Jews!’—want to set nations of millions at one another’s throats. I want only peace…You should say yes for your own sake. Etc., in no proper order, impassioned; every sentence mendacious, but I almost believe: unconsciously mendacious. The man is a blinkered fanatic.”

Victor Klemperer, I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, November 11, 1933

DAY 172 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“Political situation bleak. The only comfort or hope is when the tyranny manifests itself ever more wildly, i.e., ever more uncertain of itself…A sound film recording of Hitler, a few sentences in front of a big meeting—clenched fists, twisted face, wild bawling—’on January 30 they were still laughing at me, they won’t be laughing anymore…’ It seems that perhaps for the moment he is all-powerful—but the voice and gestures expressed impotent rage. Doubts of his omnipotence?”

Victor Klemperer, I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, July 20, 1933

DAY 86 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“The fate of the Hitler movement will undoubtedly be decided by the Jewish business. I do not understand why they have made this point of their program so central. It will sink them. But we will probably go down with them.”

Victor Klemperer, I Will Bear Witness: A Diary of the Nazi Years, April 25, 1933

DAY 195 of Hitler’s Chancellorship (Germany)

“Late in the afternoon Messersmith and directors of the United States Lines came to report the foolish order of German-American lines, supported by the government, to the effect that nobody leaving Germany might by tickets for any transportation costing more than 200 marks, i.e., on any but German ships…In a few days the German Government announced abandonment of their policy and gave a lame excuse. It is another illustration of Nazi clumsiness in international affairs.”

William E. Dodd, United States Ambassador to Germany, Ambassador Dodd’s Diaries, August 12, 1933